“HER ON” A Little Part of the World

2016 F Kelley
2016 Frances Kelley

Frances S. Kelley, president of the Swamp Fox Quilters Guild, recently completed “Her On” for her contribution to the annual challenge. The theme for this year, “It’s a Small World” made Frances think about the small creatures in the world and their habitats.  She also chose to play on the words of the name Heron. This piece measures 28″ x 30″.  It is machine appliqued and machine pieced.  Frances used a domestic sewing maching to complete the quilting.

 

 

Hands Are Itching For Fidget Quilts

IMG_0590

Are you familiar with a “fidget quilt?” Harriett Whitlock, a member of the Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild, chose to prepare a fidget quilt for her entry in this year’s quilt challenge.

A fidget quilt is used to calm the busy fidgety hands of an Alzheimer’s or dementia patient.  One of the last senses that an Alzheimer’s patient retains is the sense of touch.  The anxious and restless fingers reach out for tactile stimulation.  A fidget quilt can be a mat, a blanket, or even an apron.  Flannel is often used for backing on these quilts to help adhere to the patient’s lap. Fabric choices are important for their texture and color. Accent pieces include zippers, buttons, velcro, pockets, and laces. The different textures and activities help soothe the patient and ease the agitation. Harriett’s quilt, titled “Citrus Memories” features bright summery colors of yellow, orange, and lime green.  Her piece is available for sale.

Quilt Challenge Encourages “First-Timers”

IMG_0596

 

IMG_0595
“Woodland Gnome” sewn by Patti Hayes

 

IMG_0563
Patti Hayes receives her ribbon and certificate from Karen Kirkland, president of the “Quilters of South Carolina” state association.

Of the 35 quilts that were submitted for the Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild’s annual challenge, three were created by “first-timers”.  This is the first time that Patti Hayes has prepared an entry for any quilt show or challenge.  Her quilt was constructed using machine applique; a domestic sewing machine was used to apply the quilting.  The piece was selected to receive an award from the “Quilters of South Carolina” group for being the best among the new entrants. State president Karen Kirkland was on hand to present the handmade ribbon to Patti.

The theme of this year’s quilt challenge was “It’s A Small World.”  Stipulations required that the entries range from no smaller than 60” and no larger than 120” outer dimensions. Patti prepared a quilted portrait of a woodland gnome. The inspiration for her work stemmed from illustrations in a favorite childhood book titled “Gnomes” by Dutch artist Rien Poortvliet. According to legend, the woodland gnome reaches the prime of his life at 275 years of age, measures approximately 15 centimeters in height and weighs only 300 grams. His feet turn inward so as to outrun predators and are so very tiny that it’s nearly impossible to detect his footprints.

Other quilters who submitted for the first time included Gloria Browder for her stained-glass “Easter Cross” and Laurie Winburn for “It’s A World of Love”. All of the entries will remain on exhibit through the end of August. Be sure to stop by and vote for your favorite!

2016 L Winburn
First time entry by Laurie Winburn, titled “It’s a World of Love.”
IMG_0550
“Fly Free” sewn by Gloria Browder
cross cropped
“Easter Cross” sewn by Gloria Browder

Hartsville Museum hosts Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild Annual Challenge

IMG_0593
2016 Best of Show
IMG_0567 Karen cropped
Karen Kirkland

 The annual Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild exhibit is now open at the Hartsville Museum!  Each year a theme is selected by the guild and members develop a creation reflecting that focus. This year, challenge co-chairs Martha Herbert and Joan Goodsell selected the title “It’s a Small World.”  Unlike years past, a size limit was established for the quilts.  Each piece was required to fall within the dimensions of greater than 60” yet less than 120”.  This is quite a change since both the quilters and the guests are accustomed to pieces in a variety of sizes.  It is always a nice surprise to explore the many interpretations that the quilters conceive as they create each “one of a kind” masterpiece.

The guild met at the museum on Thursday to get the first sneak peek at the entries and to vote for this year’s awards.  Winner for “Best of Show” quilt was Karen Kirkland for her piece titled “My Little Corner of the World.”  It is a beach scene utilizing the colors blue, sand, and coral.  Measuring 24”x36”, the quilt depicts an empty wooden chair under an umbrella planted beside a palm tree on the shoreline.  Various shades of blue show the multi colors of the ocean while a white sailboat glides in front of a rising sun. The quilted wallhanging is truly a masterpiece as it was also awarded 1st place blue ribbons for Best Theme, Best Applique, and Best Pieced.  A 2nd place ribbon was received for the category of Best Machine Quilting.

Organized in 1980, the Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild is composed of members from Hartsville, Florence, Dillon, Mullins, Conway, Marion, Lake City, Timmonsville, McBee, Garden City and Darlington. The guild sponsors a monthly meeting as well as a monthly “work day” where members gather to work on their own projects, have a class, or make community quilts.  One of the highlights of the year includes educating visitors about quilting at the “Re-enactment of the Skirmish at Gamble’s Hotel” in Florence County.  For more information about the group, see  www.swampfoxquilters.com .

 

 

“Little Women” Arrive on the Scene

 

 

Recently, the Hartsville Museum was the recipient of a special donation. Emily Bailey of Clinton, SC, a great friend of the museum, arrived at our door with boxes full of treasures – including Christmas ornaments, decorations, and an assortment of dolls.  Among the dolls was the quartet from Louisa May Alcott’s book, Little Women, featuring Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy Marsh.
Originally published in two volumes, the book made its appearance in 1868 and tells the story of four “All-American” girls on their passage from childhood to womanhood. The book is based loosely on the life of the author and her three sisters. It was written explicitly for young girls yet varies greatly from the writing styles of the time.

Meg, the eldest March daughter, is a beauty who manages the household when Mother Marmee is away. She is the teacher and governess for four children of a neighboring family but mostly Meg’s life is bland in domesticity.

Jo, a strong and willful tomboy, is the principal character in Alcott’s book. Jo is hot-tempered but enjoys reading and writing – particularly plays and short stories. She tends to her grand aunt March , a frail but wealthy widow.

Beth, the third daughter, is kind and thoughtful, and yet a shy quiet musician. She is the peacemaker when arguments arise. Her primary duty is helping with the housework until she contracts scarlet fever.  After resolving herself to a shortened lifetime, Beth spends her days knitting and sewing for the local children.

Amy, the spoiled baby of the family, has the stature of a proper young lady with curly golden curls and sparkly blue eyes. She is an artist who travels to Europe with her aunt and uncle.  Although vain and self-centered, Amy is very capable of handling herself properly in polite society.

The doll characters based on this story are a design from the Madame Alexander collection.  Perhaps there is no name better known in the world of doll collecting than that of Madame Beatrice Alexander Behrman.  Her business began over 90 years ago by making dolls based on classic literature such as Heidi, Little Women, and Mary Queen of Scots.

Emily’s dolls were given to her, one at a time, in the early 1950’s when she was about 10 years old.  They have retained their impeccable condition because the dolls were “to be admired” as opposed to being playthings.  Emily says her favorite of the four was Amy because she was so feminine.  Come by the museum to see the Little Women and decide which of the four is your favorite!

 2016 Little Women Amy 2016 Little Women Meg 2016 Little Women Jo IMG_0478

It’s a Small World

LogoPlans are being made and ideas are coming together as the annual Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild exhibit nears at the Hartsville Museum.  Each year a theme is selected by the guild and members develop a creation reflecting that focus. This year, challenge co-chairs Martha Herbert and Joan Goodsell have selected the title “It’s a Small World.”  Unlike years past, a size limit has been established for the quilts.  Each piece must fall within the dimensions of greater than 60” yet less than 120”.  This will be quite a change since both the quilters and the guests are accustomed to pieces in a variety of sizes.  It is always a nice surprise to explore the many interpretations that the quilters conceive as they create each “one of a kind” masterpiece.

Organized in 1980, the Swamp Fox Quilters’ Guild is composed of members from Hartsville, Florence, Dillon, Mullins, Conway, Marion, Lake City, Timmonsville, McBee, Garden City and Darlington. The guild sponsors a monthly meeting as well as a monthly “work day” where members gather to work on their own projects, have a class, or make community quilts.  One of the highlights of the year includes educating visitors about quilting at the “Re-enactment of the Skirmish at Gamble’s Hotel” in Florence County.  For more information about the group, see  www.swampfoxquilters.com .

South Carolina Watermedia Society

“BFF: Best Friends Forever” by Suzanne Wolfe was the winner of the SCWS Past Presidents award.

The Hartsville Museum recently hosted the 38th annual exhibition of the South Carolina Watermedia Society.   Originally 222 works were submitted by 122 artists.  From these, juror Kristin Casaletto selected 71 pieces to be juried into the show.  The top 30 award winners comprise the 2015/2016 SC State Museum’s Traveling show.

Since 1977 the South Carolina Watermedia Society has been promoting the artistic and professional interests of its members while also providing visual arts programs to the public.  The Watermedia Society makes the accomplishments of its members available to a broad spectrum of SC citizens.  Marketing the original works of SC artists, SCWS is the largest statewide visual arts group.  Membership is open to any artist who lives or owns property in SC, NC, or GA.  Public outreach and educational programs are supported.

 

2016 SCWS Best of Show
“Wash Day” by Becky Hollingsworth was voted Best of Show.
Roosters
“Barnyard Stomp”, a watercolor on yupo prepared by Brenda Lawson, was also an award winner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016 SCWS Rohde
Artist Barbara Rohde of Durham, NC stopped by the Hartsville Museum to observe her painting “Gossip”. This work is transparent watercolor on paper and received the Supporters of Artists (SOA) Award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ilona Smithkin

Ilona SmithkinPetite, vivacious Ilona Royce Smithkin was born in Poland and studied at the Reimann Schule in Berlin and Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Antwerp. She emigrated to the United States in the late 1930s and studied with Robert Brackman at New York City’s Art Students’ League. An Impressionistic painter noted for her life studies and portraits, she captured many of the 20th century’s “greats and non-greats” on canvas, including Ayn Rand, Tennessee Williams and singer Bobby Short.
Venturing from her studio above New York’s Russian Tea Room, Ilona began exhibiting and teaching in Kentucky, Indiana and South Carolina. Her classes, which offered as much life guidance as art instruction, grew so popular that she was made a Kentucky Colonel by the state government, received sponsorships from private foundations and state arts’ commissions, and was presented with keys to numerous cities. She became a frequent judge at art competitions as well as a popular TV and radio guest. Her landmark television series, Ilona’s Palette, established the instructional painting genre on PBS, and was followed by Painting with Ilona (which spawned a companion book by the same title) and Finishing Touches with Ilona.
Ilona maintains a second studio in Massachusetts, where she continues to teach and exhibit at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM). Eight years ago, she discovered a knack for performing while appearing in a PAAM benefit, and her “Eyelash Cabaret”— in which Ilona performs with her frequent collaborator Zoë Lewis— has become a fixture at performance venues and private functions across the Eastern seaboard.
Today, Ilona is experiencing a renaissance. In addition to being the subject of Melissa Hammel’s award-winning documentary, Ilona, Upstairs and a recent book, Ilona Royce Smithkin: The Sixties, New York City and Provincetown by John Lucas, she continues to have her work exhibited in galleries. Recently, she’s been featured in such well-known media outlets as New York Magazine, Time Out New York and Time Out London, The Huffington Post, StyleLikeU.com, and LX-NBC. At 91, she inspires generations with her warm personality, joie de vivre, and the wisdom acquired from having lived her life as a work of art.

 

sailboat
Sailboat
Rhododendron
Rhododendron
Lady in Red Hat
Lady in Red Hat
Fruit Bowl
Fruit Bowl

Dancing with the Stars!

IMG_0419
All dressed up for “a Dash to the Bash”! Did you attend the Dancing with the Stars event? Two of the lovely ladies from our Hartsville Museum collection stepped out in their finest attire and made quite a show for themselves!

 

IMG_0421

 

 

 

IMG_0422A part of the Roaring Twenties, the “flapper” was how a young woman sought to define herself. A flapper enjoyed being seen in public, liked to be considered part of the “in” social setting, and openly embraced flouting the more traditional definitions of femininity. The attire of the flapper played a vital role in defining her – one seeking to capture the feeling of freedom. This favored attire consisted of a shapeless or dropwaist sheath dress with beading, fringe or soft draping on one side. The movement of some fringe or a few tiers of chiffon made dresses swish and jingle while dancing “the Charleston” thereby drawing the attention that a flapper desired. The dress featured is a black custom-made frock that displays the soft side draping on a sleeveless sheath with a modest v-shaped neckline. It features a popular style of self-tie and is dripping in generous lampshade fringe. Pretty and tiny, the 1920’s beaded flapper bags were highly decorated to match the beautiful dresses. A thing of beauty, this hand-beaded purse was far from being practical. It was needed only to carry a few necessities – a makeup compact, a few dollars, and cigarettes (gasp!). A shawl, wrap, or large scarf was usually worn to provide the smallest amount of modesty. This black silk scarf features lace with long fringe that perfectly accentuates the fringe of the dress.

Women of the 1920’s were trendy young ladies who danced the night away in the most fashion forward clothing of the day. Evening dresses were designed to show as much skin as was morally acceptable. The evening attire featured showcases a pink silk underslip covered by a loose fitting gold sequined slipover. Typical of the Gatsby style, this exquisite handmade gown was definitely made to “stand out” in the crowd. Evening wear of the era was noted for elaborate beaded, fringed, hand-painted scarves and evening shawls inspired by the styles of the Orient. This luscious scarf made of gold silk features intricate embroidery and long strands of fringe. Scarves, shawls, and wraps were works of art – affordable only to the upper class.

The roaring twenties will forever be remembered as the decade of flappers. Free of the moral and physical constraints of the previous decades, the clothing was loose but glamorous. The transformative ladies took great care while preparing for their ‘Dash to the Bash”.

The Hartsville Museum was pleased to provide two dresses from our collection to be featured at the recent “Dancing with the Stars” fund-raiser. The event was held at the Center Theater on January 28, 2016.